nacelle

The cover for the gear box, drive train, generator, and other components of a wind turbine. (US Dept of Energy)

NAECA

The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, 42 USC 6291 et seq., as amended, Public Law 100-12. (Energycodes.gov)

NAGDM

National Association of Garage Door Manufacturers. (Energycodes.gov)

Name Plate

A metal tag attached to a machine or appliance that contains information such as brand name, serial number, voltage, power ratings under specified conditions, and other manufacturer supplied data. (US Dept of Energy)

Name plate capacity

Equipment rating as required by the purchaser. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

Nameplate

Power generation capacity of a generator that can be guaranteed under continuous operation. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

Nanometer (millimicron)

One millionth of a millimeter. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Airspace System

(aka NAS) The common network of U.S. airspace; air navigation facilities, equipment, and services; airports or landing areas; aeronautical charts, information, and services; rules, regulations, and procedures; technical information, manpower, and material. Included are system components shared jointly with the military. (FAA4) (FAA8) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National Ambient Air Quality Standards

(aka NAAQS) Federal standards that set allowable concentrations and exposure limits for various pollutants. The EPA developed the standards in response to a requirement of the CAA. Air quality standards have been established for the following six criteria pollutants: ozone (or smog), carbon monoxide, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, lead, and sulfur dioxide. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National Association of Master Appraisers

(aka NAMA) A non profit professional association organized in 1982, dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate appraisal. (HardwickAssociates)

National Association of Securities Dealers

A self-regulatory organization with jurisdiction over certain broker-dealers. The NASD requires member brokers to register and conducts examinations for compliance with net capital requirements and other regulations. It also conducts market surveillance of the over-the-counter (OTC) securities market. National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (NASDAQ) is a subsidiary of the NASD which facilitates the trading of approximately 5,000 most active OTC issues through an electronically connected network. (Federal Reserve Education)

National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations

(aka NASDAQ ) A computerized system established by the NASD to facilitate trading by providing broker/dealers with current bid and ask price quotes on over-the-counter stocks and some listed stocks. (Federal Reserve Education)

national bank

A bank that is subject to the supervision of the Comptroller of the Currency. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency is a bureau of the U.S. Treasury Department. A national bank can be recognized because it must have "national" or "national association" in its name. (Help With My Bank)

national bank examiner

An employee of the Comptroller of the Currency whose function is to examine national banks periodically to determine the financial position of a bank and the security of its deposits. The examiner also verifies that the bank maintains procedures consistent with Federal banking laws and regulations. (Help With My Bank)

National Cooperative Highway Research Program

(aka NCHRP) The cooperative research, development, and technology transfer (RD&T) program directed toward solving problems of national or regional significance identified by States and the FHWA, and administered by the Transportation Research Board, National Academy of Sciences. (23CFR420) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National Cooperative Transit Research and Development Program

A program established under Section 6a) of the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964, as amended, to provide a mechanism by which the principal client groups of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration can join cooperatively in an attempt to resolve near-term public transportation problems through applied research, development, testing, and evaluation. NCTRP is administered by the Transportation Research Board. (TRB1) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National Credit Repositories

Currently, there are three companies that maintain national credit - reporting databases. These are Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union, referred to as Credit Bureaus. (US Dept of HUD)

National Credit Union Administration

(aka NCUA) The federal government agency that supervises, charters and insures federal credit unions. NCUA also insures state-chartered credit unions that apply and qualify for insurance. The NCUA also operates a credit facility for member credit unions. (Federal Reserve Education) The Federal regulatory agency that charters and supervises Federal credit unions. (NCUA also administers the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund, which insures the deposits of Federal credit unions.) (Help With My Bank) The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) is the independent federal agency that charters and supervises federal credit unions. NCUA, backed of the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, operates the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund (NCUSIF) insuring the savings of 90 million account holders in all federal credit unions and many state?chartered credit unions. (National Credit Union Administration)

National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund

The National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund (NCUSIF) is the federal fund created by Congress in 1970 to insure member's deposits in federally insured credit unions. The insurance limit was temporarily increased from $100,000 to $250,000 per individual depositor on October 3, 2008. Administered by the National Credit Union Administration, the NCUSIF is backed by the "full faith and credit" of the U.S. Government. (National Credit Union Administration)

national disaster medical system

A system designed to deal with extensive medical care needs in very large disasters or emergencies. The system is a cooperative effort of the Department of Health and Human Services, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Defense, State and local governments, and the private sector. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Electrical Code

The NEC is a set of regulations that have contributed to making the electrical systems in the United States one of the safest in the world. The intent of the NEC is to ensure safe electrical systems are designed and installed. The National Fire Protection Association has sponsored the NEC since 1911. The NEC changes as technology evolves and component sophistication increases. The NEC is updated every three years. Following the NEC is required in most locations. (US Dept of Energy)

National Environmental Policy Act of 1969

(aka NEPA) Established a national environmental policy requiring that any project using federal funding or requiring federal approval, including transportation projects, examine the effects of proposed and alternative choices on the environment before a federal decision is made. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration) An act requiring analysis, public comment, and reporting for environmental impacts of Federal actions. See National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Flood Insurance Program

(aka NFIP) The program of flood insurance coverage and floodplain management administered under the Flood Disaster Protection Act (FDPA or Act) and applicable Federal regulations found in Title 44 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Subchapter B. (Help With My Bank) The program of flood insurance coverage and floodplain management administered under the Act and applicable Federal regulations promulgated in Title 44 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Subchapter B. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929

National standard reference datum for elevations, formerly referred to as Mean Sea Level (MSL) of 1929. NGVD 1929 may be used as the reference datum on some FIRMs. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

National Highway System

(aka NHS) This system of highways designated and approved in accordance with the provisions of 23 U.S.C. 103b). (23CFR500) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

(aka NHTSA) The Administration was established by the Highway Safety Act of 1970 (23 U.S.C. 401 note). The Administration was established to carry out a congressional mandate to reduce the mounting number of deaths, injuries, and economic losses resulting from motor vehicle crashes on the Nation's highways and to provide motor vehicle damage susceptibility and ease of repair information, motor vehicle inspection demonstrations and protection of purchasers of motor vehicles having altered odometers, and to provide average standards for greater vehicle mileage per gallon of fuel for vehicles under 10,000 pounds (gross vehicle weight). (OFR1) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National Historic Trail

(aka NHT) A historic or prehistoric route of travel of significance to the entire Nation. It must meet three criteria listed in Section 5(b)(11) of the National Trails System Act, and be established by Act of Congress. 16 U.S.C. 1241-51. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National Hydrography Dataset

The National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) is the surface water component of The National Map. The NHD is a digital vector dataset used by geographic information systems (GIS). It contains features such as lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, canals, dams and streamgages.� (US Fish & Wildlife Service)

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

NIOSH is the Federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for the prevention of work-related disease and injury. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Interagency Fire Center

(aka NIFC) The National Interagency Fire Center is the nation's support center for wildland firefighting. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National ITS Architecture

A systems framework to guide the planning and deployment of ITS infrastructure. The national ITS architecture is a blueprint for the coordinated development of ITS technologies in the U.S. It is unlikely that any single metropolitan area or state would plan to implement the entire national ITS architecture. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

(aka NOAA) The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's mission is to describe and predict changes in the Earth's environment, and conserve and wisely manage the Nation's coastal and marine resources. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Organic Program

USDA organic regulatory program for organic agriculture established under the Organic Foods Production Act of 1990. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

National Park Service

(aka NPS) The National Park Service preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the national park system for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. NPS is an agency within the U.S. Department of the Interior. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System

(aka NPDES) The primary permitting program under the Clean Water Act which regulates all discharges to surface water. (US EPA- Pesticides) A permitting program under section 402 of the Clean Water Act required for all point sources discharging pollutants into waters of the United States. The purpose of the NPDES program is to protect human health and the environment. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

national posted price

Weekly price announced by the CCC for peanuts used to determine the loan repayment rate. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

national rate of unemployment

The rate of unemployment attainable without stimulating an increase in the inflation rate. (Federal Reserve Education)

National Register of Historic Places

A federally maintained register of districts, sites, buildings, structures, architecture, archeology, and culture. Visit the National Register of Historic Places website. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Research Initiatives for Food, Agriculture and Environment of 1990

The 1990 Farm Act extended the role of competitive grants within USDA by formalizing the competitive process via the National Research Initiatives for Food, Agriculture and Environment. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

National Response Center

(aka NRC) The primary communications center operated by the U.S. Coast Guard to receive reports of major chemical and oil spills and other hazardous substances into the environment. The NRC immediately relays reports to a predesignated federal On-Scene Coordinator. (US EPA- Pesticides) Located at the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, D.C., the NRC is a 24-hour national communications center and the single point of contact for pollution - incident reporting. It is also the National Response Team's communications center. Immediate reporting is required for reportable quantities of petroleum or hazardous substances 40 CFR 300.125(c). (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Response Team

NRT consists of representatives from several Federal agencies including the Department of the Interior (DOI) and the Bureau of Reclamation. NRT is primarily a policy board which provides program direction, planning and preparedness guidance, and review of regional response activites. NRT should be activated as an emergency response team when an oil or hazardous substance release exceeds the response capability of the region(s), transects regional boundaries; or involves a significant threat to public health or welfare or the environment, substantial amounts of property, or substantial threats to natural resources. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

(aka NRECA) This is a national organization dedicated to representing the interests of cooperative electric power providers and the consumers they serve. Members come from the 46 states that have an electric distribution cooperative. (US Dept of Energy)

National Scenic Byways Program

(aka NSBP) Designates roads that have outstanding scenic, historic, cultural, natural, recreational, and archaeological qualities as All-American Roads or National Scenic Byways, and provides grants for scenic byway projects. 23 U.S.C. 162 (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National Scenic Trail

(aka NST) A continuous, primarily nonmotorized route of outstanding recreation opportunity, established by Act of Congress. 16 U.S.C. 1241-51. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National School Lunch Program

Federally assisted meal program operating in public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions. Established under the National School Lunch Act in 1946. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost lunches that are free to children in households with incomes at or below 130 percent of poverty and reduced price for those in households with incomes between 130 and 185 percent of poverty. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

National Society of Real Estate Appraisers

An organization founded in 1956 which promotes standards of professionalism in its members. (HardwickAssociates)

National Spatial Data Infrastructure

(aka NSDI) Executive Order 12906 calls for the establishment of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure defined as the technologies, policies, and people necessary to promote sharing of geospatial data throughout all levels of government, the private and non-profit sectors, and the academic community.� The goal of this Infrastructure is to reduce duplication of effort among agencies, improve quality and reduce costs related to geographic information, to make geographic data more accessible to the public, to increase the benefits of using available data, and to establish key partnerships with states, counties, cities, tribal nations, academia and the private sector to increase data availability. Consistent means to share geographic data among all users could produce significant savings for data collection and use and enhance decision making.� (US Fish & Wildlife Service)

National Trails System

(aka NTS) The network of scenic, historic, and recreation trails created by the National Trails System Act of 1968. These trails provide for outdoor recreation needs, promote the enjoyment, appreciation, and preservation of open-air, outdoor areas and historic resources, and encourage public access and citizen involvement. 16 U.S.C. 1241-51. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

National Warning System

(aka NAWAS) A dedicated, commercially leased, nationwide voice telephone warning system operated on a 24-hour basis, with a National Warning Center and an Alternate National Warning Center staffed by attack warning officers. Special purpose telephone circuits connect the National and Alternate National Warning Centers (NAWAS) to the following: Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters and regional offices; selected Federal departments and agencies; military installations; and State, county, and city warning points. NAWAS is the only national system designed and maintained to warn the public of a nuclear attack or a natural or manmade disaster. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Water Quality Assessment Program

Describes current water quality conditions for a large part of the United States freshwater stream, rivers, and aquifers. Describes how water quality is changing over time. Improves understanding of the primary natural and human factors that affect water quality conditions. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

National Weather Service

(aka NWS) The National Weather Service provides weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the United States, its territories, adjacent waters and ocean areas, for the protection of life and property and the enhancement of the national economy. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nationalization

The takeover by the government with or without compensation of a private entity. The Continental Illinois Corporation assistance transaction of 1984 was referred to at the time by some commentators as a �nationalization� of the bank, since the FDIC acquired an 80 percent equity interest in the bank under the terms of the assistance agreement. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

Nationwide Rivers Inventory

(aka NRI) The Nationwide Rivers Inventory is a listing of more than 3,400 free-flowing river segments in the United States that are believed to possess one or more "outstandingly remarkable" natural or cultural values judged to be of more than local or regional significance. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

Native American Local Technical Assistance Programs

Primarily responsible for transportation related technology transfer to Native Americans through Tribal Technical Assistance Program (TTAP) Centers. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

native gas

��Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir in contrast to injected gas volumes. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural cooling

Space cooling achieved by shading, natural (unassisted, as opposed to forced) ventilation, conduction control, radiation, and evaporation; also called passive cooling. (US Dept of Energy)

natural draft

Draft that is caused by temperature differences in the air. (US Dept of Energy)

natural floodway

The channel of a water course and those portions of the adjoining flood plain which are reasonably required to carry a selected probability flood. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

natural frequency

(aka f) The natural frequencies of a structure are the frequencies of free vibration. Free vibration is vibration that occurs in the absence of forced vibration. In a structure undergoing vibration, a mode of vibration is a characteristic pattern (shape) assumed by the structure in which the motion of every particle is simple harmonic motion with the same frequency. The fundamental mode of vibration of a structure is the mode having the lowest natural frequency. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

natural gas

��A gaseous mixture of hydrocarbon compounds, the primary one being methane. (US Energy Information Administration) A naturally occurring mixture of hydrocarbon and nonhydrocarbon gases found in porous geologic formations beneath the Earth's surface, often in association with petroleum. The principal constituent is methane. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration) A hydrocarbon gas obtained from underground sources, often in association with petroleum and coal deposits. It generally contains a high percentage of methane, varying amounts of ethane, and inert gases; used as a heating fuel. (US Dept of Energy)

natural gas field facility

��A field facility designed to process natural gas produced from more than one lease for the purpose of recovering condensate from a stream of natural gas; however, some field facilities are designed to recover propane, normal butane, pentanes plus, etc., and to control the quality of natural gas to be marketed. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas gross withdrawals

��Full well-stream volume of produced natural gas, excluding condensate separated at the lease. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas hydrates

��Solid, crystalline, wax-like substances composed of water, methane, and usually a small amount of other gases, with the gases being trapped in the interstices of a water-ice lattice. They form beneath permafrost and on the ocean floor under conditions of moderately high pressure and at temperatures near the freezing point of water. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas lease production

��Gross withdrawals of natural gas minus gas production injected on the lease into producing reservoirs, vented, flared, used as fuel on the lease, and nonhydrocarbon gases removed in treating or processing operations on the lease. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas liquids

��A group of hydrocarbons including ethane, propane, normal butane, isobutane, and natural gasoline. Generally include natural gas plant liquids and all liquefied refinery gases except olefins. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas liquids production

��The volume of natural gas liquids removed from natural gas in lease separators, field facilities, gas processing plants, or cycling plants during the report year. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas marketed production

��Gross withdrawals of natural gas from production reservoirs, less gas used for reservoir repressuring, nonhydrocarbon gases removed in treating and processing operations, and quantities vented and flared. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas marketer

��A company that arranges purchases and sales of natural gas. Unlike pipeline companies or local distribution companies, a marketer does not own physical assets commonly used in the supply of natural gas, such as pipelines or storage fields. A marketer may be an affiliate of another company, such as a local distribution company, natural gas pipeline, or producer, but it operates independently of other segments of the company. In States with residential choice programs, marketers serve as alternative suppliers to residential users of natural gas, which is delivered by a local distribution company. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas plant liquids

(aka NGPL) Those hydrocarbons in natural gas that are separated as liquids at natural gas processing, fractionating, and cycling plants. Products obtained include ethane, liquefied petroleum gases (propane, normal butane, and isobutane), and natural gasoline. Component products may be fractionated or mixed. Lease condensate and plant condensate are excluded. Note: Some EIA publications categorize NGPL production as field production, in accordance with definitions used prior to January 2014. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas plant liquids (NGPL) production

��The extraction of gas plant liquids constituents such as ethane, propane, normal butane, isobutane, and natural gasoline, sometimes referred to as extraction loss. Usually reported in barrels or gallons, but may be reported in cubic feet for purposes of comparison with dry natural gas volumes. (US Energy Information Administration)

Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978

(aka NGPA) Signed into law on November 9, 1978, the NGPA is a framework for the regulation of most facets of the natural gas industry. (US Energy Information Administration) Section 311 Construction, allows an interstate pipeline company to transport gas "on behalf of" any intrastate pipeline or local distribution company. Pipeline companies may expand or construct facilities used solely to enable this transportation service, subject to certain conditions and reporting requirements. (DOE1) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

natural gas processing plant

��Facilities designed to recover natural gas liquids from a stream of natural gas that may or may not have passed through lease separators and/or field separation facilities. These facilities control the quality of the natural gas to be marketed. Cycling plants are classified as gas processing plants. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas production

��See Dry natural gas production. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas steam reforming production

A two step process where in the first step natural gas is exposed to a high-temperature steam to produce hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The second step is to convert the carbon monoxide with steam to produce additional hydrogen and carbon dioxide. (US Dept of Energy)

natural gas used for injection

��Natural gas used to pressurize crude oil reservoirs in an attempt to increase oil recovery or in instances where there is no market for the natural gas. Natural gas used for injection is sometimes referred to as repressuring. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gas, "dry"

��See Dry natural gas. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gasoline

��A commodity product commonly traded in NGL markets that comprises liquid hydrocarbons (mostly pentanes and hexanes) and generally remains liquid at ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressure. Natural gasoline is equivalent to pentanes plus. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural gasoline and isopentane

��A mixture of hydrocarbons, mostly pentanes and heavier, extracted from natural gas, that meets vapor pressure, end-point, and other specifications for natural gasoline set by the Gas Processors Association. Includes isopentane which is a saturated branch-chain hydrocarbon, (C5H12), obtained by fractionation of natural gasoline or isomerization of normal pentane. (US Energy Information Administration)

natural grade

The grade unaffected by construction techniques such as fill, landscaping, or berming. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

Natural Person Credit Union

(aka NPCU) A financial cooperative that serves consumers sharing an occupational, associational, or community common bond. (National Credit Union Administration)

natural rate of unemployment

The rate of unemployment attainable without stimulating an increase in the inflation rate. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF)

natural vacancy rate

The percentage of vacant properties in a given area that is the result of natural turnover and market forces. (HardwickAssociates)

natural ventilation

The movement of air into and out of a home through random holes and cracks, and open windows and doors. The air movement is caused by wind and by temperature differences (which drives the stack effect). (US Environmental Protection Agency) Ventilation that is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of high pressure to areas of low pressure with gravity and wind pressure affecting the airflow. The placement and control of doors and windows alters natural ventilation patterns. (US Dept of Energy)

naturalness

Area which generally appears to have been affected primarily by the forces of nature, with the imprint of man's work substantially unnoticeable. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

navigable waters

Waters of the United States including: (a) All waters that are currently used, were used in the past, or may be susceptible to use in interstate or foreign commerence, including all waters that are subject to the ebb and flow of the tide. (b) Interstate waters, including interstate wetlands. (c) All other waters such as intrastate lakes, rivers, streams (including intermittent streams), mudflats, sandflats and wetlands, the use, degradation, or destruction of which would affect or could affect interstate or foreign commerce, including waters used or which could be used for industries in interstate commerce. (d) All impoundments of waters otherwise defined as navigable waters. (e) Tributaries of waters identified in (a) through (d). (f) Wetlands adjacent to waters identified in (a) through (d). (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

NCSBCS

The National Conference of States on Building Codes and Standards. (Energycodes.gov)

NCUA

The National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund (NCUSIF) is the federal fund created by Congress in 1970 to insure member's deposits in federally insured credit unions. The insurance limit was temporarily increased from $100,000 to $250,000 per individual depositor on October 3, 2008. Administered by the National Credit Union Administration, the NCUSIF is backed by the "full faith and credit" of the U.S. Government. (National Credit Union Administration)

neatlines (of structure)

A line which defines the limits of work, such as an excavation, cut stone, etc. Also, the true face line of a building regardless of the projections of the stones; a line back of, or inside of, incidental projections. Any material removed beyond the neat line is overbreak. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

needle valve

Any of a family of valves which regulate flow through the use of a needle moving into and out of an orifice. Types include the Ensign Valve, Balanced Needle Valve, Internal Differential Needle Valve, and Interior Differential Needle Valve. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

needle-leaved deciduous�

Woody gymnosperms (trees or shrubs) with needle-shaped or scale-like leaves that are shed during the cold or dry season; e.g., bald cypress (Tazodium distichum). (US Fish & Wildlife Service)

needle-leaved evergreen�

Woody gymnosperms with green, needle-shaped, or scale-like leaves that are retained by plants throughout the year; e.g., black spruce (Picea mariana). (US Fish & Wildlife Service)

negative amortization

A situation in which a borrower is paying less interest than what is actually being charged for a mortgage loan. The unpaid interest is added to the loan's principal. The borrower may end up owing more than the original amount of the mortgage. (Ginnie Mae) An increase in the balance of a loan caused by adding unpaid interest to the loan balance; this occurs when the payment does not cover the interest due. (Federal Trade Commission) An increase in the principal of a loan, when the loan payments are insufficient to pay the interest due. The unpaid interest is added to the outstanding loan balance causing the principal to increase rather than decrease as payments are made. This situation typically occurs in an adjustable mortgage with an annual cap limiting any increases in the interest rate, and also in a graduated payment mortgage, which has low initial payments so moderate-income borrowers can afford to make the loan payments. (Federal Reserve Education) An increase in the principal of a loan, when the loan payments are insufficient to pay the interest due. The unpaid interest is added to the outstanding loan balance causing the principal to increase rather than decrease as payments are made. This situation typically occurs in an adjustable mortgage with an annual cap limiting any increases in the interest rate, and also in a graduated payment mortgage, which has low initial payments so moderate-income borrowers can afford to make the loan payments. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF) Occurs when the monthly payments in an adjustable-rate mortgage loan do not cover all the interest owed. The interest that is not paid in the monthly payment is added to the loan balance. This means that even aft er making many payments, you could owe more than you did at the beginning of the loan. Negative amortization can occur when an ARM has a payment cap that results in monthly payments that are not high enough to cover the interest due or when the minimum payments are set at an amount lower than the amount you owe in interest. (Federal Reserve Board- Handbook on Adjustable Rate Mortgages) An increase in the outstanding balance of a loan resulting from the failure of periodic payments to cover required interest charged on the loan. Generally occurs during the first 5 to 10 years of the life of a graduated payment mortgage (GPM) and under indexed loans for which the applicable interest rate may be changed without affecting the monthly payments. (US Dept of Commerce- Census Bureau) Amortization means that monthly payments are large enough to pay the interest and reduce the principal on your mortgage. Negative amortization occurs when the monthly payments do not cover all of the interest cost. The interest cost that isn't covered is added to the unpaid principal balance. This means that even after making many payments, you could owe more than you did at the beginning of the loan. Negative amortization can occur when an ARM has a payment cap that results in monthly payments not high enough to cover the interest due. (US Dept of HUD) An actual increase in the principal amount of real estate loan because of the addition of matured but unpaid interest to the loan balance. Usually the result of monthly payments which a re temporarily set at a lower than needed level. (Old Republic National Title Insurance Co) When the balance of a loan increases instead of decreases. Usually due to a borrower making a minimum payment on an Adjustable Rate Mortgage during a period when the rate fluctuates to a high enough point that the minimum payment does not cover all of the interest. (HardwickAssociates)

negative equity

The condition of owing more on the property than the property is worth. (Making Home Affordable)

negative pressure

A condition that exists when less air is supplied to a space than is exhausted from the space, so the air pressure within that space is less than that in surrounding areas. Under this condition, if an opening exists, air will flow from surrounding areas into the negatively pressurized space. (US Environmental Protection Agency) Condition that exists when less air is supplied to a space than is exhausted from the space, so the air pressure within that space is less than that in surrounding areas. Under this condition, if an opening exists, air will flow from surrounding areas into the negatively pressurized space. (US Environmental Protection Agency) Pressure within a pipe that is less than atmospheric pressure. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

negligent servicing or origination

Negligent servicing or origination is a failure to perform those services, which a reasonably prudent lender would perform in servicing or originating its own portfolio, and includes not only the failure to act, but also the failure to act in a timely manner. (US Dept of Agriculture- Rural Development)

Negotiable Order of Withdrawal Account

An interest-earning account on which checks may be drawn. Withdrawals from NOW accounts may be offered by commercial banks, mutual savings banks, and savings and loan associations and may be owned only by individuals and certain nonprofit organizations and governmental units. (Federal Reserve Education) A savings account from which withdrawals can be made by negotiable orders of withdrawal (functional equivalent of checks). This is an interest-bearing account for which the bank must reserve the right to require the depositor to provide at least seven days notice of his/her intent to withdraw funds. (Help With My Bank)

neighborhood

A subsection of a municipality that has been designated by a developer, economic forces or physical formations. (HardwickAssociates)

neighborhood life-cycle

The evolution of neighborhood use and demographics over time. Economic fluctuations, municipal zoning changes and population shifts can effect the life cycle. (HardwickAssociates)

Neighborhood Stabilization Program

(aka NSP) Provides emergency assistance to state and local governments to acquire and redevelop foreclosed properties that might otherwise become sources of abandonment and blight within their communities. The Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) provides grants to every state and certain local communities to purchase foreclosed or abandoned homes and to rehabilitate, resell, or redevelop these homes in order to stabilize neighborhoods and stem the decline of house values of neighboring homes. The program is authorized under Title III of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008. (US Dept of HUD)

nematicides

Kill nematodes (microscopic, worm-like organisms that feed on plant roots) (US EPA- Pesticides)

nematodes

Microscopic, elongated worms that live on other organisms in the soil. (US Dept of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service) Tiny, usually microscopic, unsegmented worms. Some are parasites of animals or plants. Most live free in the soil. (US Dept of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service)

neoprene

A synthetic rubber with superior resistance to oils; often used as gasket and washer material. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

neotropic migrant (neotropical)

A bird that migrates to tropical regions during the winter. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nephelometric

A means of measuring turbidity in a sample by using an instrument called a nephelometer. A nephelometer passes light through a sample and the amount of light deflected (usually at a 90-degree angle) is then measured. The unit of measure for turbidity is a nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU). (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

net (lower) heating value

(aka NHV) The potential energy available in a fuel as received, taking into account the energy loss in evaporating and superheating the water in the fuel. Equal to the higher heating value minus 1050W where W is the weight of the water formed from the hydrogen in the fuel, and 1050 is the latent heat of vaporization of water, in Btu, at 77 degrees Fahrenheit. (US Dept of Energy)

net capability

The maximum load-carrying ability of the equipment, exclusive of station use, under specified conditions for a given time interval, independent of the characteristics of the load. Capability is determined by design characteristics, physical conditions, adequacy of prime mover, energy supply, and operating limitations such as cooling and circulating water supply and temperature, headwater and tailwater elevations, and electrical use. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

net collections

The net cash recoveries resulting from the disposition of a portfolio of assets. Generally speaking, net collections are equal to gross collections less all relevant holding, marketing, and selling costs during the collection period. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

net cut

The cut required, less the fill required, at a particular station or part of a road. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

net economic benefits

Economic benefits less economic costs. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

net economic value

NEV is the difference between the sum of the present values of all cash flows from assets and the sum of the present values of all cash flows from liabilities. Conceptually, NEV is an attempt to gauge the true economic value of book capital. Specifically, NEV is a proxy or estimated value used for capital when the sensitivity of capital to changes in prevailing interest rates is calculated. In practice, base values of NEV are typically compared under up/down 300 basis points scenarios as a measure of risk. (National Credit Union Administration)

net energy production (or balance)

The amount of useful energy produced by a system less the amount of energy required to produce the fuel. (US Dept of Energy)

net fill

The fill required, less the cut required, at a particular station or part of a road. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

net generation

Equal to gross generation less electricity consumption of a power plant. (US Dept of Energy)

net income

Your take-home pay, the amount of money that you receive in your paycheck after taxes and deductions. (US Dept of HUD)

net leasable area

The space in a development, outside of the common areas, that can be rented to tenants. (HardwickAssociates)

net maximum interest rate

For an adjustable-rate mortgage loan, the maximum interest rate on a mortgage loan provided in the related mortgage documents, after the applicable fee percentage (servicing fee and guaranty fee) has been subtracted. (Also known as PTR Cap, Maximum Accrual Rate, or Net Life Cap.) (Fannie Mae)

net metering

The practice of using a single meter to measure consumption and generation of electricity by a small generation facility (such as a house with a wind or solar photovoltaic system). The net energy produced or consumed is purchased from or sold to the power provider, respectively. (US Dept of Energy)

net monthly income

Your take-home pay after taxes. It is the amount of money that you actually receive in your paycheck. (Freddie Mac) Your take-home pay after taxes. It is the amount of money that you actually receive in your paycheck. (Federal Trade Commission)

net mortgage margin

For an adjustable-rate mortgage loan, the gross mortgage margin after the applicable fee percentage (servicing and guaranty fee) has been subtracted. Also known as MBS Margin. (Fannie Mae)

net present value

(aka NPV) The net present value is the value today of a series of future cash flows discounted at a suitable discount rate. The net present value is sometimes referred to as the �present value.� (Also see net recovery rate.) (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation) The value of a personal portfolio, product, or investment after depreciation and interest on debt capital are subtracted from operating income. It can also be thought of as the equivalent worth of all cash flows relative to a base point called the present. (US Dept of Energy)

net recovery rate

Ratio of the net-present-value-of-net-collections-to-book-valuereductions. This performance measurement, in contrast with the �recovery rate,� involves discounting net collections at an appropriate discount rate to determine the �net present value of net collections� before this ratio can be calculated. The net recovery rate is sometimes referred to as the �net recovery.� (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

net wall area

The net wall area includes the opaque wall area of all above-grade walls enclosing conditioned spaces, the opaque area of conditioned basement walls less than 50% below grade (including the below-grade portions), and peripheral edges of floors. The net wall area does not include windows, doors, or other such openings, because they are treated separately. (Energycodes.gov)

net worth

The value of a company or individual�s assets, including cash, less total liabilities. (Federal Trade Commission) The difference between the total assets and total liabilities of an individual. (Federal Reserve Education)

net worth certificate

(aka NWC) A capital instrument purchased by the FDIC or the former FSLIC under a special program created by Congress in 1982 to maintain or increase the capital of troubled institutions that qualified for the program. Under this program, the FDIC purchased a net worth certificate from a qualified institution in exchange for an FDIC insured promissory note, which was an asset on the bank�s books, with the offsetting liability of the net worth certificate counted as regulatory capital. Extended twice by Congress, this program expired in 1986. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

neutralization

The chemical process in which the acidic or basic characteristics of a fluid are changed to those of water (pH = 7). (US EPA- Pesticides)

neutron probe

An instrument used to estimate soil moisture. Relates the rate of attenuation in pulsed neutron emissions to soil water content. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

new construction

Buildings for which the "start of construction" commenced on or after the effective date of an initial FIRM or after December 31, 1974, whichever is later, including any subsequent improvements. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

new england colonial

An architectural style dating from early American history typified by a two-story building with clapboard siding. (HardwickAssociates)

new hampshire plan

The strategy used in resolving seven New Hampshire banks that failed in October 1991. The FDIC combined and marketed the banks as two franchises instead of marketing the failed bank franchises individually. The FDIC appointed a third-party contractor under an asset management contract to manage and dispose of the failed banks� distressed assets. The New Hampshire Plan was significant in part because it was the first time the FDIC solicited asset management contractors that were not eligible to be assuming institutions. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

new york rod

A leveling rod marked with narrow lines, ruler-fashion. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

newel

The upright post or the upright formed by the inner or smaller ends of steps about which steps of a circular staircase wind. In a straight flight staircase, the principal post at the foot or the secondary post at a landing. (Publications- USA.gov)

newton

A force which, when applied to a body having a mass of one kilogram, gives it an acceleration of one meter per second squared. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

next rate change date

For an adjustable-rate mortgage loan, the next date on which the interest rate for a loan is subject to change. Also known as Next Rate Adjustment Date. (Fannie Mae)

NFIP Bureau and Statistical Agent

A corporation, partnership, association, or any other organized entity that contracts with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to be the focal point of support operations for the NFIP. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

NFIP Servicing Agent

A corporation, partnership, association, or any other organized entity that contracts with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to service insurance policies as direct business. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

NFPA

National Fire Protection Association. (Energycodes.gov)

NFRC

National Fenestration Rating Council. (Energycodes.gov)

NIFA

National Institute for Food and Agriculture. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

NIOSH

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, and is the only federal Institute responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for the prevention of work-related illnesses and injuries. (US Environmental Protection Agency)

nipple

A short piece of pipe with male threads on each end. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nitrates

Plant nutrient and fertilizer that enters water supply sources from fertilizers, animal feed lots, manures, sewage, septic systems, industrial wastewaters, sanitary landfills, and garbage dumps. (US EPA- Water Drinking Water Consumer Information Private Wells Glossary)

nitrification

A process accomplished by a few groups of aerobic organisms in which ammonia is converted to nitrite and then nitrate. (US Dept of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service)

nitrogen dioxide

This compound of nitrogen and oxygen is formed by the oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) which is produced by the combustion of solid fuels. (US Dept of Energy)

nitrogen oxide emissions

Nitrogen oxides (NOx), the term used to describe the sum of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (N02) and other oxides of nitrogen, play a major role in the formation of ozone. The major sources of man?made NOx emissions are high?temperature combustion processes, such as those occurring in automobiles and power plants. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

nitrogen oxides

(aka NOx) A product of combustion of fossil fuels whose production increases with the temperature of the process. It can become an air pollutant if concentrations are excessive. (DOE6) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration) The products of all combustion processes formed by the combination of nitrogen and oxygen. (US Dept of Energy)

no action alternative

The projected baseline condition, or future without. The expected future condition if no action is taken (not necessarily the same as the present condition). The effects of action alternatives are measured against this baseline condition. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

no cash out refinance

A refinance of an existing loan only for the amount remaining on the mortgage. The borrower does not get any cash against the equity of the home. Also called a "rate and term refinance." (US Dept of HUD)

no cost loan

There are many variations of a no cost loan. Generally, it is a loan that does not charge for items such as title insurance, escrow fees, settlement fees, appraisal, recording fees or notary fees. It may also offer no points. This lessens the need for upfront cash during the buying process however no cost loans have a higher interest rate. (US Dept of HUD)

no jeopardy opinion

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) or National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) opinion that an action is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of listed species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitat. See jeopardy opinion. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

no net cost

A requirement that a price support program be operated at no cost to the Federal Government. The No-Net-Cost Act of 1982 required participants in the 1982 and subsequent tobacco programs to pay an assessment to cover potential losses in operating the tobacco price support program. A no-net-cost provision for sugar was initiated under the Food Security Act of 1985, suspended under the 1996 Farm Act, and reimplemented under the 2002 Farm Act and is continued in the 2008 Farm Act. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL)

The highest dose in a toxicity stufy which does not result in adverse health effects. (US EPA- Pesticides) (aka NOAEL or NOEL) A level of exposure which does not cause observable harm. (US EPA- Pesticides)

no-asset case

A chapter 7 case where there are no assets available to satisfy any portion of the creditors' unsecured claims. (US Courts (Federal Courts)- Bankruptcy Basics)

no-cost loan

Many lenders offer loans that you can obtain at "no cost." You should inquire whether this means there are no "lender" costs associated with the loan, or if it also covers the other costs you would normally have in a purchase or refinance transactions, such as title insurance, escrow fees, settlement fees, appraisal, recording fees, notary fees, and others. These are fees and costs which may be associated with buying a home or obtaining a loan, but not charged directly by the lender. Keep in mind that, like a "no-point" loan, the interest rate will be higher than if you obtain a loan that has costs associated with it. (HardwickAssociates)

nocturnal cooling

The effect of cooling by the radiation of heat from a building to the night sky. (US Dept of Energy)

NOFA

A �Notice of Funding Availability� published in the Federal Register to inform interested parties of the availability of assistance and other non-regulatory matters pertinent to the program. (US Dept of Agriculture- Rural Development)

noise standards

23 U.S.C. 109(i) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

nominal capacity

The approximate energy producing capacity of a power plant, under specified conditions, usually during periods of highest load. (US Dept of Energy)

nominal diameter

An approximate measurement of the diameter of a pipe. Although the nominal diameter is used to describe the size or diameter of a pipe, it is usually not the exact inside diameter of the pipe. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nominal dollars

Dollar value in the indicated year, not adjusted for inflation. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nominal interest rates

Current stated rates of interest paid or earned. (Federal Reserve Education)

nominal price

The price paid for goods or services at the time of a transaction; a price that has not been adjusted to account for inflation. (US Dept of Energy)

nominal size

The approximate dimension(s) of standard materials. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nominee loan

A loan made to one individual in which the proceeds of the loan benefit another individual without the knowledge of the lender. (Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council)

non-agricultural sectors

General term which refers to a combination of home/garden and industrial/commercial/governmental sectors. (US EPA- Pesticides)

non-assumption clause

In a mortgage contract, a statement that prohibits a new buyer from assuming a mortgage loan without the approval of the lender. (Ginnie Mae)

nonattainment area

(aka NAA) Any geographic area that has not met the requirements for clean air as set out in the Clean Air Act of 1990. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

noncompetitive bidders

One of two categories of bidders on Treasury securities: competitive and noncompetitive. Noncompetitive bidders, made up of individuals or financial institutions, receive the average price and investment yield of the accepted competitive bids. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF)

noncompliance

Failure to comply with a standard or regulation issued under 46 U.S.C. Chapter 43, or with a section of the statutes. (USCG1) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

non-conforming loan

A loan that does not conform to Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA) or Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (FHLMC) guidelines. Jumbo loans are nonconforming. (Ginnie Mae) A loan that exceeds Fannie Mae's and Freddie Mac's loan limits. Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae loans are referred to as conforming loans. (US Dept of HUD)

non-conforming use

The use of land for purposes contrary to the applicable municipal zoning specifications. Often occurs when zoning changes after a property is in use. (HardwickAssociates)

nonconsumptive water uses

Water uses that do not substantially deplete water supplies, including swimming, boating, waterskiing, fishing, maintenance of stream related fish and wildlife habitat, and hydropower generation. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

noncultivated cropland

See Cropland. (US Dept of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service)

noncurrent liabilities

Non-current portion of long-term debt and of capital leases, advances to associated companies and other liabilities not due during the normal business cycle. (BTS4) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

nondischargeable debt

A debt that cannot be eliminated in bankruptcy. Examples include a home mortgage, debts for alimony or child support, certain taxes, debts for most government funded or guaranteed educational loans or benefit overpayments, debts arising from death or personal injury caused by driving while intoxicated or under the influence of drugs, and debts for restitution or a criminal fine included in a sentence on the debtor's conviction of a crime. Some debts, such as debts for money or property obtained by false pretenses and debts for fraud or defalcation while acting in a fiduciary capacity may be declared nondischargeable only if a creditor timely files and prevails in a nondischargeability action. (US Courts (Federal Courts)- Bankruptcy Basics)

non-federally funded��

Financial support comes from state, local, or private funds with no contribution either directly or indirectly from Federal sources.� (US Fish & Wildlife Service)

nonfirm commercial energy

Energy periodically available for sale at lower than firm power rates. All energy which cannot be considered as firm. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nonfirm power

Power that is not available continuously and may be interruptible. This power may be marketed on a short-term basis. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nonhydrocarbon gases

��Typical nonhydrocarbon gases that may be present in reservoir natural gas, such as carbondioxide, helium, hydrogen sulfide, and nitrogen. (US Energy Information Administration)

nonliquid asset

Any asset which can not be quickly converted into cash at little or no cost. (HardwickAssociates)

non-liquid asset

An asset that cannot easily be converted into cash. (Federal Trade Commission)

nonmember bank

Depository institution that is not a member of the Federal Reserve System. Specifically, a state-chartered commercial bank that has elected not to join the System. (Federal Reserve Education)

nonmember depository institution

A depository institution (commercial bank, mutual savings bank, savings and loan association, credit union, or U.S. agency or branch of a foreign bank) that is not a member of the Federal Reserve System. Nonmember depository institutions that offer transaction accounts or nonpersonal time deposits are subject to reserve requirements set by the Federal Reserve, and have access to the Federal Reserve discount window and Federal Reserve services on the same terms as member banks. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF)

non-monetary default

A default that does not involve the payment of money. (US Dept of Agriculture- Rural Development)

nonoccupant (automobile)

Any person who is not an occupant of a motor vehicle in transport (e.g., bystanders, pedestrians, pedalcyclists, or an occupant of a parked motor vehicle). (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

nonperforming asset

An asset such as a mortgage that is not currently accruing interest or which interest is not being paid. (US Dept of HUD)

nonpersistent emergents�

Emergent hydrophytes whose leaves and stems break down at the end of the growing season so that most above-ground portions of the plants are easily transported by currents, waves, or ice. The breakdown may result from normal decay or the physical force of strong waves or ice. At certain seasons of the year there are no visible traces of the plants above the surface of the water; e.g., wild rice (Zizania aquatica), arrow arum (Peltandra virginica). (US Fish & Wildlife Service)

nonpoint source

Any source of pollution not associated with a distinct discharge point. Includes sources such as rainwater, runoff from agricultural lands, industrial sites, parking lots, and timber operations, as well as escaping gases from pipes and fittings. (US EPA- Pesticides) A contributing factor to water pollution that cannot be traced to a specific spot. Man-made or man-induced alteration of the chemical, physical, biological, or radiological integrity of water, originating from any source other than a point source. Pollution which comes from diffuse sources such as urban and agricultural runoff. Major nonpoint sources of pollution include excess farm and lawn nutrients that move through the soil into the ground water or enter local water directly through runoff during heavy rains; uncontrolled storm water runoff from construction sites; forestry operations; animal wastes; and even pollutants released directly into the atmosphere. Pollution sources which are diffuse and do not have a single point of origin or are not introduced into a receiving stream from a specific outlet. The pollutants are generally carried off the land by stormwater runoff. The commonly used categories for nonpoint sources are: agriculture, forestry, urban, mining, construction, dams and channels, land disposal, and saltwater intrusion. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

non-potable

Water that may contain objectionable pollution, contamination, minerals, or infective agents and is considered unsafe and/or unpalatable for drinking. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nonpreference customer

A customer excluded by law from preference in the purchase of federally produced electrical energy. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nonprofit housing organization

Any private organization that is organized under state or local laws; has no part of its net earnings inuring to the benefit of any member, founder, contributor, or individual; and has a long-term record of service in providing or financing quality affordable housing for low-income families through relationships with public entities. (US Dept of HUD)

non-recirculating system

A domestic or service hot water distribution system that is not a recirculating system. (Energycodes.gov)

nonrecourse loan program

Program providing commodity-secured loan funds to producers for a specified period of time (typically 9 months), after which producers may either repay the loan and accrued interest or transfer ownership of the commodity amount pledged as collateral to the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) as full settlement of the loan, without penalty. These loans, also referred to as "commodity loans," are available on a crop year basis for wheat, feed grains, cotton, peanuts, rice, oilseeds, pulse crops, wool, mohair and honey. Sugar processors are also eligible for nonrecourse loans. Participants in commodity loan programs receive loan funds based on the commodity-specific, per-unit loan rate specified in legislation. The loans are called nonrecourse because, at the producer's option, the CCC has no recourse but to accept the commodity as full settlement of the loan. Under the Marketing Loan Program, producers of eligible commodities may repay the loan at the world price (rice and upland cotton), posted county price (wheat, feed grains, and oilseeds) or national posted price (peanuts) when these prices are below the year's set commodity loan rate, thus providing a disincentive to crop forfeiture. Some commodity loans are recourse loans, meaning producers must pay back the loans in cash. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

non-reimbursable

Cost of constructing, operating, or maintaining a Reclamation project that is borne by the Federal taxpayer and is not reimbursed by any other individual, entity, or organization. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

non-renewable energy

Energy derived from a fossil fuel source. (Energycodes.gov)

nonrenewable fuels

Fuels that cannot be easily made or "renewed," such as oil, natural gas, and coal. (US Dept of Energy)

nonresident commercial driver's license

A commercial driver's license (CDL) issued by a State to an individual domiciled in a foreign country. (49CFR383) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

nonresidential

Property designed for use by retail, wholesale, office, hotel, service, or other commercial use. (US Dept of Commerce- Census Bureau)

non-residential

A type of building occupancy that includes, but is not limited to: small business concerns, churches, schools, farm buildings (including grain bins and silos), garages, poolhouses, clubhouses, recreational buildings, mercantile buildings, agricultural and industrial buildings, warehouses, nursing homes, licensed bed and breakfasts, and hotels and motels with normal room rentals for less than 6 months. (Federal Emergency Management Agency) All occupancies other than residential. (Energycodes.gov)

nonsoil

Sand and rocks found in beaches, rocky shores, streambeds, and other habitat; which may not have wetland plants or hydric soils. (US Fish & Wildlife Service)

non-standard part-load value

(aka NPLV) A single-number, part-load efficiency figure of merit calculated and referenced to conditions other than IPLV conditions, for units that are not designed to operate at ARI Standard Rating Conditions. (Energycodes.gov)

non-target organism

Any organism for which the pesticide was not intended to control. (US EPA- Pesticides)

nonterritorial communities

Networks of associations around shared goals, values, and norms, such as the agricultural, environmental, or recreational community; also known as "special interest communities." (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

non-uniform flow

The velocity varies with position. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

non-utility generator/power producer

A class of power generator that is not a regulated power provider and that has generating plants for the purpose of supplying electric power required in the conduct of their industrial and commercial operations. (US Dept of Energy)

non-utility generators

(aka NUG's) Facilities for generating electricity that are not owned exclusively by an electric utility and which operate connected to an electric utility system. A term coined to describe Qualifying Facilities, independent power producers, exempt wholesale generators, and any other company in the power generation business which has been exempted from traditional utility regulation. Some NUG facilities are built by users primarily for their own energy needs. Other NUG plants are built specifically to sell power to utilities under long-term contracts. In the last five years, more than 50 percent of new generation capacity has been constructed by non-utility generators. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

nonutility power producer

��A corporation, person, agency, authority, or other legal entity or instrumentality that owns or operates facilities for electric generation and is not an electric utility. Nonutility power producers include qualifying cogenerators, qualifying small power producers, and other nonutility generators (including independent power producers). Non-utility power producers are without a designated franchised service area and do not file forms listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 18, Part 141 (US Energy Information Administration) A corporation, person, agency, authority, or other legal entity or instrumentality that owns electric generating capacity and is not an electric utility. Nonutility power producers include qualifying cogenerators, qualifying small power producers, and other nonutility generators (including independent power producers) without a designated franchised service area, and which do not file forms listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 18, Part 141. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

no-point loan

A loan with no "points". The interest rate on such a loan will be higher than a loan with points paid. Also sometimes refers to a refinance loan where closing costs are included in the loan. (HardwickAssociates)

normal

A central value (such as arithmetic average or median) of annual quantities for a 30-year period ending with an even 10-year, thus 1921-50; 1931-60, and so forth. This definition accords with that recommended by the Subcommittee on Hydrology of the Federal Inter-Agency Committee on Water Resources. (US Dept of the Interior- US Geological Survey)

normal depth

The depth of flow that would exist for a steady-uniform flow condition. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

normal flex acreage

A term given to the 15 percent of a farmer's acreage base that was not eligible for deficiency payments during 1991-95 but could receives nonrecourse loans and marketing loans for the commodity produced. Producers were allowed to plant any crop on this normal flex acreage, except fruits, vegetables, and some other prohibited crops, without a reduction in their crop acreage base. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

normal loading conditions

Loading conditions that occur or are anticipated to occur with some degree of regularity or frequency, as constrasted to unusual loading conditions such as an MCE or PMF. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

normal recovery capacity

A characteristic applied to domestic water heaters that is the amount of gallons raised 100 degrees Fahrenheit per hour (or minute) under a specified thermal efficiency. (US Dept of Energy)

normal water surface

The highest elevation at which water is normally stored, or that elevation which the reservoir should be operated for conservation purposes. Usually the elevation at the top of the active conservation capacity. The maximum elevation to which the reservoir may rise under normal operating conditions exclusive of flood control capacity. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

North American Electric Reliability Council

Principal organization for coordinating and promoting reliability for North America's electric utilities. NERC was formed in 1968 in the aftermath of the November 9, 1965 northeast blackout. A council formed in 1968 by the electric utility industry to promote the reliability and adequacy of bulk power supply in the electric utility systems of North America. NERC consists of ten regional reliability councils and encompasses essentially all the power regional of the contiguous United States, Canada, and Mexico. The NERC Regions are: Alaskan System Coordination Council (ASCC) ECAR - East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement ERCOT - Electric Reliability Council of Texas MAIN - Mid-America Interconnected Network MAAC - Mid-Atlantic Area Council MAPP - Mid-Continent Area Power Pool NPCC - Northeast Power Coordinating Council SERC - Southeastern Electric Reliability Council SPP - Southwest Power Pool WSCC - Western Systems Coordinating Council (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

North American Vertical Datum of 1988

(aka NAVD) The vertical control datum established for vertical control surveying in the Unites States of America based upon the General Adjustment of the North American Datum of 1988. It replaces the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

north-oriented

Facing within 45 degrees of true north (northern hemisphere). (Energycodes.gov)

nosing

The rounded edge of a stair tread. (Publications- USA.gov)

not automatically protected

There are several types of Federal benefits that are not automatically protected under 31CFR 212: Federal benefits received by check rather than direct deposit; Federal benefits received more than two months before the bank received the garnishment order or Federal benefits that were transferred to another bank account. The benefits may be exempt from garnishment but you will have to alert the court or creditor. (Help With My Bank)

notary

A person who certifies the authenticity of required signatures on a document, by signing and stamping the document. (See also eNotary.) (Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council) One authorized to take acknowledgments. See "Acknowledgment." (Old Republic National Title Insurance Co)

notary public

A person who serves as a public official and certifies the authenticity of required signatures on a document by signing and stamping the document. (US Dept of HUD)

note

See also: Conforming Loan (Ginnie Mae) A written promise to pay a specified amount under the agreed upon conditions. (Federal Trade Commission) A medium-term obligation of the U.S. Treasury; 2-10 years� maturity. See also bill and bond. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF) A legal document obligating a borrower to repay a mortgage loan at a stated interest rate over a specified period of time. (US Dept of HUD) Any note, bond, assumption agreement, or other evidence of indebtedness pertaining to a guaranteed loan. (US Dept of Agriculture- Rural Development) The instrument evidencing the indebtedness secured by a security instrument such as a mortgage or deed of trust. (Old Republic National Title Insurance Co) A legal document that obligates a borrower to repay a mortgage loan at a stated interest rate during a specified period of time. (HardwickAssociates)

note rate

The interest rate stated on a mortgage note, or other loan agreement. O (Federal Trade Commission) The interest rate stated on a mortgage note. (US Dept of HUD) The interest rate stated on a mortgage note. (HardwickAssociates)

notice of default

A formal written notice to a borrower that there is a default on a loan and that legal action is possible. (US Dept of HUD) Formal written notice from a lender to a borrower that default has occurred. (HardwickAssociates)

notice of funding availability

Written notice to the respective area tribes that the BIA area office has received contractible program funds. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

notification

The third of five Early Warning System components consisting of communicating alerts and warnings about an emergency condition at a dam to appropriate local officials so they can take proper action(s). (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

notional principal amount

The proposed amount which interest rate swap payments are based but generally not paid or received by either party. (US Dept of HUD)

NPLV

See Non-standard part-load value. (Energycodes.gov)

NP-series

An RTC equity partnership created in 1995 and designed for the smaller investor. The composition of NP-Series portfolios was similar to that of the N-Series, SSeries and SN-Series pools; however, the portfolios of the NP-Series were the smallest in the RTC equity partnership program, averaging under $70 million in book value each. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

NRI

The National Research Initiatives for Food, Agriculture, and Environment of 1990. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

N-series

An RTC equity partnership targeted for the institutional investor market. There were six Nonperforming Loan Series, or N-Series, transactions, consisting of relatively large portfolios of nonperforming and subperforming commercial mortgages. The N-Series asset pools had an average book value in excess of $450 million. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

N-type semiconductor

A semiconductor produced by doping an intrinsic semiconductor with an electron-donor impurity (e.g., phosphorous in silicon). (US Dept of Energy)

nuclear energy

Energy that comes from splitting atoms of radioactive materials, such as uranium, and which produces radioactive wastes. (US Dept of Energy)

nullification

The act of declaring an insurance contract invalid from its inception so that, from a legal standpoint, the insurance contract never existed. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

number of borrowers

The number of individuals obligated to repay the mortgage loan. (Fannie Mae)

number of units

The number of units comprising the related mortgaged property. (Fannie Mae)

numismatic

Pertaining to coins and the collection of coins and medals. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF)

nutrient

A substance that supplies nourishment for an organism to live. It can be food or chemical depending upon the organism. (US Dept of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service)

nutrient exchange

The process by which plant roots exchange an acid for nutrients from the soil. (US Dept of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service)

nutrients

Animal, vegetable, or mineral substance which sustains individual organisms and ecosystems. Any substance that is assimilated by organisms and promotes growth. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

NWWDA

National Wood Window and Door Association. (Energycodes.gov)