gabion

Wire basket, filled with stones, used to stabilize banks of a water course and to enhance habitat. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gabion dam

Special name given to a crib dam when built with gabions. See dam. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gable

The triangular part of a wall under the inverted "v" of the roof line. (Publications- USA.gov)

gable roof

A steeply angled, triangular roof. (HardwickAssociates)

gable vent

A screened vent installed at or near the peak of a roof gable that allows warm attic air to escape. (Energy Star.gov)

gage height

(aka GH) The water surface elevation referred to some arbitrary gage datum. Gage height is often used interchangeably with the more general term "stage," although gage height is more appropriate when used with a reading on a gage. See gauge height. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gaging station

A particular site on a stream, canal, lake, or reservoir where systematic observations of gage height or discharge are obtained. (See also Stream-gaging station.) (US Dept of the Interior- US Geological Survey)

gaining stream

Stream or reach that receives water from the zone of saturation. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gallery

A passageway within the body of a dam, its foundation, or abutments used for inspection, foundation grouting, and/or drainage. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gallium arsenide

A compound used to make certain types of solar photovoltaic cells. (US Dept of Energy)

gallon

A unit of measure equal to four quarts or 128 fluid ounces. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

galvanize

To coat a metal (especially iron or steel) with zinc. Galvanization is the process of coating a metal with zinc. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

galvanized pipe

Iron pipe with a galvanized (zinc) coating. (HardwickAssociates)

gambrel roof

A roof with two pitches, designed to provide more space on upper floors. The roof is steeper on its lower slope and flatter toward the ridge. (Publications- USA.gov) A ''barn-like'' roof, where the upper portion of the roof is less-steeply angled than the lower part. (HardwickAssociates)

gametes

Eggs or sperm. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gantry

An overhead structure that supports machines or operating parts, such as a gantry crane. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gantry crane

A fixed or traveling, bent-supported crane for handling heavy equipment. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

garbage

Food waste (animal and vegetable) resulting from the handling, storage, packaging, sale, preparation, cooking, and serving of foods. (US EPA- Pesticides)

garnishment

A notice to an employer or other asset holder requiring that monies, wages, or property due a debtor be withheld and given a creditor to be applied to a specific debt in arrears. (Federal Reserve Education)

garnishment/garnish

A legal process that allows a creditor to remove funds from your bank account to satisfy a debt that you have not paid. If you owe money to a person or company, they can obtain a court order directing your bank to take money out of your account to pay off your debt. (Help With My Bank)

Garn�St Germain Depository Institutions Act

Legislation enacted in 1982 that gave the thrift industry a great deal more flexibility in managing assets and liabilities. It gave the thrift industry the right to (1) invest up to 50 percent of assets in construction and development loans; (2) invest up to 30 percent of assets in consumer loans, commercial paper, and corporate debt; (3) own real estate development companies; (4) use land and other noncash assets in the capitalization of new charters, instead of the previously required cash; and (5) offer money market deposit accounts. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

gas condensate well gas

��Natural gas remaining after the removal of the lease condensate. (US Energy Information Administration)

gas sorption

Devices used to reduce levels of airborne gaseous compounds by passing the air through materials that extract the gases. The performance of solid sorbents is dependent on the airflow rate, concentration of the pollutants, presence of other gases or vapors, and other factors. (US Environmental Protection Agency)

gas turbine

A type of turbine in which combusted, pressurized gas is directed against a series of blades connected to a shaft, which forces the shaft to turn to produce mechanical energy. (US Dept of Energy)

gas well

��A well completed for production of natural gas from one or more gas zones or reservoirs. Such wells contain no completions for the production of crude oil. (US Energy Information Administration)

gaseous supersaturation

Condition of higher levels of dissolved gases in water due to entrainment, pressure increases, or heating. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gasification

The process in which a solid fuel is converted into a gas; also known as pyrolitic distillation or pyrolysis. Production of a clean fuel gas makes a wide variety of power options available. (US Dept of Energy)

gasifier

A device for converting a solid fuel to a gaseous fuel. (US Dept of Energy)

gasket/seal

A seal used to prevent the leakage of fluids, and also maintain the pressure in an enclosure. (US Dept of Energy)

gasohol

A blend of finished motor gasoline (leaded or unleaded) and alcohol (generally ethanol but sometimes methanol) limited to 10 percent by volume of alcohol. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration) A registered trademark of an agency of the state of Nebraska, for an automotive fuel containing a blend of 10 percent ethanol and 90 percent gasoline. (US Dept of Energy)

gasoline

A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons, with or without small quantities of additives that have been blended to produce a fuel suitable for use in spark ignition engines. Motor gasoline includes both leaded or unleaded grades of finished motor gasoline, blending components, and gasohol. Leaded gasoline is no longer used in highway motor vehicles in the United States. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration) A refined petroleum product suitable for use as a fuel in internal combustion engines. (US Dept of Energy)

gate

A device that controls the flow in a conduit, pipe, or tunnel without obstructing any portion of the waterway when in the fully open position. Structure or device for controlling the rate of flow into or from a canal or ditch. A movable, watertight barrier for the control of water in a waterway. See bear-trap gate, bulkhead gate, clam shell gate, coaster gate, crest gate, cylinder gate, drum gate, emergency gate, fixed-wheel gate, flap gate, flood gate, guard gate, high-pressure gate, jet-flow gate, outlet gate, paradox gate, radial gate, regulating gate, ring gate, ring- follower gate, ring seal gate, roller gate, skimmer gate, slide gate, sluice gate, stoney gate, tainter gate, tractor gate, vertical lift gate, or wicket gate. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gate chamber (valve chamber)

A chamber in which a guard gate in a pressurized outlet works or both the guard and regulating gates in a free-flow outlet works are located. A room from which a gate or valve can be operated, or sometimes in which the gate is located. Concrete portion of an outlet works containing gates between upstream and downstream conduits and/or tunnels. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gate hanger

A device used to maintain a set gate opening. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gate structure

Portion of spillway between inlet channel and chute, tunnel or conduit, which contains gates, such as radial gates. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gate valve

A valve with a circular-shaped closing element that fits securely over an opening through which water flows. A valve that utilizes a disc moving at a right angle to the flow to regulate the rate of flow. When a gate valve is fully opened, there is no obstruction to the flow. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gated pipe

Portable pipe with small gates installed along one side for distributing irrigation water to corrugations or furrows. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gated spillway

Overflow section of dam restricted by use of gates that can be operated to control releases from the reservoir to ensure the safety of the dam. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gauge (gage)

Device for registering water level, discharge, velocity, pressure, etc. Thickness of wire or sheet metal. A number that defines the thickness of the sheet used to make steel pipe. The larger the number, the thinner the pipe wall. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gauge height

Elevation of water surface measured by a gauge. See gage height. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gauge pressure

Absolute pressure minus atmospheric pressure. The pressure within a closed container as measured with a gauge. Sometimes referred to as relative pressure. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gauging station

Specific location on a stream where systematic observations of hydrologic data are obtained through mechanical or electrical means. See gauge. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gauss

The unit of magnetic field intensity equal to 1 dyne per unit pole. (US Dept of Energy)

General Accounting Office

(aka GAO) An investigative arm of the U.S. Congress charged with examining all matters relating to the receipt and disbursement of public funds. Established in 1921 to independently audit federal government agencies, the GAO functions under the direction of the comptroller general of the United States, who is appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate for a 15-year term. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation) The General Accounting Office is the audit, evaluation, and investigative arm of Congress. GAO exists to support the Congress in meeting its Constitutional responsibilities and to help improve the performance and ensure the accountability of the federal government for the American people. GAO examines the use of public funds, evaluates federal programs and activities, and provides analyses, options, recommendations, and other assistance to help the Congress make effective oversight, policy, and funding decisions. In this context, GAO works to continuously improve the economy, efficiency, and effectiveness of the federal government through financial audits, program reviews and evaluations, analyses, legal opinions, investigations, and other services. GAO's activities are designed to ensure the executive branch's accountability to the Congress under the Constitution and the government's accountability to the American people. GAO is dedicated to good government through its commitment to the core values of accountability, integrity, and reliability. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

general aviation

1) All civil aviation operations other than scheduled air services and nonscheduled air transport operations for taxis, commuter air carriers, and air travel clubs that do not hold Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity. 2) All civil aviation activity except that of air carriers certificated in accordance with Federal Aviation Regulations, Parts 121, 123, 127, and 135. The types of aircraft used in general aviation range from corporate multiengine jet aircraft piloted by professional crews to amateur-built single-engine piston-driven acrobatic planes to balloons and dirigibles. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

general contractor

A person who oversees a home improvement or construction project and handles various aspects such as scheduling workers and ordering supplies. (Federal Trade Commission)

general creditors

Entities, including uninsured depositors, suppliers, tradespeople, and contractors, with unsecured claims against a failed financial institution. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

general lien

A broad-based claim against several properties owned by a defaulting party. (HardwickAssociates)

general lighting

Lighting that provides a substantially uniform level of illumination throughout an area. General lighting shall not include decorative lighting or lighting that provides a dissimilar level of illumination to serve a specialized application or feature within an area. (Energycodes.gov)

general obligation bond

A type of municipal bond backed by the full faith and credit of the governmental unit that issues it. (Federal Reserve Education)

general partner

A type of partner within a general or limited partnership. In a general partnership, there are two or more general partners, all the partners are general, and they are all co-owners liable for company debts to the full extent of their personal assets. In a limited partnership, there are one or more general partners and the business is managed by the general partner(s). (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

general partnership

A partnership made up of general partners, without special (limited) partners; that is, no partner's liability is limited. (US Dept of Commerce- Census Bureau)

general property form

See Standard Flood Insurance Policy--General Property Form. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

general service lamp

A class of incandescent lamps that provide light in virtually all directions. General service lamps are typically characterized by bulb shapes such as A, standard; S, straight side; F, flame; G, globe; and PS, pear straight. (Energycodes.gov)

generalist

A species that will eat or prey on a wide variety of food resources. (See specialist) (US Dept of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service)

generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP)

Accounting rules and conventions established by the Financial Accounting Standards Board that define acceptable practices in preparing financial statements. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

generally accepted engineering standard

A specification, rule, guide, or procedure in the field of engineering, or related thereto, recognized and accepted as authoritative. (Energycodes.gov)

generation

The energy generated in kWh (kilowatt-hours) represents gross generation. It consists of the total generation minus station use. Process of producing electric energy by transforming other forms of energy. Amount of electric energy produced, expressed in kilowatt-hours. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

generation dispatch and control

Aggregating and dispatching (sending off to some location) generation from various generating facilities, providing backup and reliability services. Ancillary services include the provision of reactive power, frequency control, and load following. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

generator

A facility or mobile source that emits pollutants into the air; any person who produces a hazardous waste that is listed by EPA and therefore subject to regulation. (US EPA- Pesticides) A device for converting mechanical energy to electrical energy. (US Dept of Energy) Machine that converts mechanical energy into electrical energy. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

generator nameplate capacity

The full-load continuous rating of a generator, prime mover, or other electric power production equipment under specific conditions as designated by the manufacturer. Installed generator nameplate rating is usually indicated on a nameplate physically attached to the generator. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

geocoding

The process of identifying the coordinates of a location given its address. (US Dept of HUD)

geodatabase

A geodatabase is a database designed to store, query, and manipulate geographic information and spatial data of low dimensionality.� Vector data can be stored as point, line or polygon data types, and may have an associated spatial reference system.� Geodatabases can also be used to serve data directly to web map server software. (US Fish & Wildlife Service)

Geographic Information System

(aka GIS) A computer system for the input, storage, processing, applications development, retrieval, and maintenance of information about the points, lines, and areas that represent the streets and roads, rivers, railroads, geographic entities, and other features on the surface of the earth � information that previously was available only on paper maps. (US Dept of HUD) 1) Computerized data management system designed to capture, store, retrieve, analyze, and display geographically referenced information. 2) A system of hardware, software, and data for collecting, storing, analyzing, and disseminating information about areas of the Earth. For Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) purposes, Geographical Information System (GIS) is defined as a highway network (spatial data which graphically represents the geometry of the highways, an electronic map) and its geographically referenced component attributes (HPMS section data, bridge data, and other data including socioeconomic data) that are integrated through GIS technology to perform analyses. From this, GIS can display attributes and analyze results electronically in map form. (FHWA2) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

geohydrology

Geological study of the character, source, and mode of ground water. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

geology

The science that deals with the physical history of the earth, the rocks of which it is comprised, and the physical changes which the earth has undergone or is undergoing. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

geomorphic

Of or relating to the form or shape of the earth. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

geomorphology

Geological study of the configuration, characteristics, origin, and evolution of land forms and earth features. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

geophysics

Refers to the physics of the earth, e.g., seismology, oceanography, volcanology, geomagnetism, etc. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

geopressurized brines

These brines are hot (300 F to 400 F) (149 C to 204 C) pressurized waters that contain dissolved methane and lie at depths of 10,000 ft (3048 m) to more than 20,000 ft (6096 m) below the earth's surface. The best known geopressured reservoirs lie along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast. At least three types of energy could be obtained: thermal energy from high-temperature fluids; hydraulic energy from the high pressure; and chemical energy from burning the dissolved methane gas. (US Dept of Energy)

Georgian

A classic, English-style hose characterized by simple rectangular shape and multiple stories. (HardwickAssociates)

geotextiles

Any fabric or textile (natural or synthetic) used as an engineering material in conjunction with soil, foundations, or rock. Geotextiles provide the following uses: drainage, filtration, separation of materials, reinforcement, moisture barriers, and erosion protection. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

geothermal energy

Energy produced by the internal heat of the earth; geothermal heat sources include: hydrothermal convective systems; pressurized water reservoirs; hot dry rocks; manual gradients; and magma. Geothermal energy can be used directly for heating or to produce electric power. (US Dept of Energy)

geothermal heat pump

A type of heat pump that uses the ground, ground water, or ponds as a heat source and heat sink, rather than outside air. Ground or water temperatures are more constant and are warmer in winter and cooler in summer than air temperatures. Geothermal heat pumps operate more efficiently than "conventional" or "air source" heat pumps. (US Dept of Energy)

geothermal power station

An electricity generating facility that uses geothermal energy. (US Dept of Energy)

GFI

Ground Fault Interrupter. A type of circuit breaker required in areas where water is present. (HardwickAssociates)

giant salvinia (salvinia molesta)

An aquatic fern prohibited in the United States by Federal law. An invasive, rapidly growing plant that covers the surfaces of lakes and streams forming floating mats that shade and crowd out important native plants. Thick mats reduce oxygen content, degrading water quality for fish and other organisms, impeding boating, fishing and swimming, and clogging water intakes for irrigation and electrical generation. The plant spreads aggressively by fragmenting and has oblong floating leaves, 1/2 to 1 1/2 inches long. Young plants have smaller leaves that lie flat on the water surface. As the plant matures and aggregates into mats, leaves fold and compress into upright chains. For more information visit the Giant Salvinia website. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gift

A sum of money, including amounts from a relative or a grant from the borrower's employer, a municipality, non-profit religious organization, or non-profit community organization that does not have to be repaid. (Ginnie Mae)

gift letter

A letter that a family member writes verifying that s/he has given you a certain amount of money as a gift and that you don't have to repay it. You can use this money towards a portion of your down payment with some mortgages. (Freddie Mac) A letter that a family member writes verifying that s/he has given you a certain amount of money as a gift and that you don�t have to repay it. You can use this money towards a portion of your down payment with some mortgages. (Federal Trade Commission)

gigawatt

(aka GW) A unit of power equal to 1 billion Watts; 1 million kilowatts, or 1,000 megawatts. (US Dept of Energy) Unit of power equal to 1 billion watts. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gigawatt-hour

(aka GWh) One billion watthours of electrical energy. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gin pole

A pole used to assist in raising a tower. (US Dept of Energy)

Ginnie Mae

Nickname for Government National Mortgage Association (GNMA). (Ginnie Mae) A federal association, working with FHA, that offers special assistance in obtaining mortgages, and purchases mortgages in a secondary capacity. Ginnie Mae's two main programs guarantee payments to investors in mortgage-backed securities, and absorb the write-down of low-interest rate loans that are used to finance low-income housing. Formerly known as the "Government National Mortgage Association (GNMA)." (US Dept of Commerce- Census Bureau) Government National Mortgage Association (GNMA); a government-owned corporation overseen by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Ginnie Mae pools FHA-insured and VA-guaranteed loans to back securities for private investment; as With Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the investment income provides funding that may then be lent to eligible borrowers by lenders. (US Dept of HUD) Ginnie Mae is a reference to the Government National Mortgage Association. (US Dept of Agriculture- Rural Development) Government National Mortgage Association (also GNMA) is a wholly-owned United States corporation that guarantees privately issued securities backed by pools of mortgages insured by FHA (Federal Housing Administration), FMHA (Farm e r s Home Administration) or VA (Veterans Administration). (Old Republic National Title Insurance Co) A wholly owned corporation created in 1968 within the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to serve low-to moderate-income homebuyers. (HardwickAssociates)

girder

A main member in a framed floor supporting the joists which carry the flooring boards. It carries the weight of a floor or partition. (Publications- USA.gov) A main supporting beam. (HardwickAssociates)

GIS

See Geographic Information System (US Dept of HUD)

glacial moraine

A mass of loose rock, soil, and earth deposited by the edge of a glacier. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

glacial striations

Lines carved into rock by overriding ice, showing the direction of glacial movement. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

glacial till

Material deposited by glaciation, usually composed of a wide range of particle sizes, which has not been subjected to the sorting action of water. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

glacier

Bodies of land ice that consist of recrystallized snow accumulated on the surface of the ground (Matthes, 1949, p. 150), and that move slowly downslope. (US Dept of the Interior- US Geological Survey)

glacier (ice sheet)

A large thick mass of ice formed on land by the compacting and recrystallization of old snow and move under the influence of gravity. Glaciers survive from year to year, and creep downslope or outward due to the stress of their own weight. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

glare

The sensation produced by luminance within the visual field that is sufficiently greater than the luminance to which the eyes are adapted to cause annoyance, discomfort, or loss in visual performance and visibility. (Energy Star.gov) The excessive brightness from a direct light source that makes it difficult to see what one wishes to see. A bright object in front of a dark background usually will cause glare. Bright lights reflecting off a television or computer screen or even a printed page produces glare. Intense light sources�such as bright incandescent lamps�are likely to produce more direct glare than large fluorescent lamps. However, glare is primarily the result of relative placement of light sources and the objects being viewed. (US Dept of Energy)

Glauber's salt

A salt, sodium sulfate decahydrate, that melts at 90 degrees Fahrenheit; a component of eutectic salts that can be used for storing heat. (US Dept of Energy)

glazed wall system

A category of site-assembled fenestration products, which includes, but is not limited to, curtain walls and solariums. (Energycodes.gov)

glazing

Fitting glass into windows or doors. (Publications- USA.gov) Any translucent or transparent material in exterior openings of buildings, including windows, skylights, sliding doors, the glass area of opaque doors, and glass block. (Energycodes.gov) A term used for the transparent or translucent material in a window. This material (i.e. glass, plastic films, coated glass) is used for admitting solar energy and light through windows. (US Dept of Energy) Transparent or translucent material (glass or plastic) used to admit light and/or to reduce heat loss; used for building windows, skylights, or greenhouses, or for covering the aperture of a solar collector. (US Dept of Energy)

glazing area

The area of a glazing assembly is the interior surface area of the entire assembly, including glazing, sash, curbing, and other framing elements. The nominal area or rough opening is also acceptable for flat windows and doors. (Energycodes.gov)

glazing U-factor

Based on the interior-surface area of the entire assembly, including glazing, sash, curbing, and other framing elements. Center-of-glass U-factors cannot be used. (Energycodes.gov)

global debt facility

Designed to allow investors all over the world to purchase debt (loans) of U.S. dollar and foreign currency through a variety of clearing systems. (US Dept of HUD)

global economy

International economic activity which includes the world-wide integration of markets for goods, services, labor, and capital. (Federal Reserve Education)

global insolation (or solar radiation)

The total diffuse and direct insolation on a horizontal surface, averaged over a specified period of time. (US Dept of Energy)

Global Positioning Systems

(aka GPS) Space-based radio positioning systems that provide 24-hour, three-dimensional position, velocity, and time information to suitably equipped users anywhere on or near the surface of the Earth. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

global warming

A popular term used to describe the increase in average global temperatures due to the greenhouse effect. (US Dept of Energy)

gneiss

Metamorphic rock that displays distinct banding of light and dark mineral layers. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

goals

Generalized statements which broadly relate to the physical environment to values (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

goggle valve

See ring follower gate. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

going concern value

The value of a business entity rather than the value of the real property. The valuation is based on the existing operations of the business and its current operating record, with the assumption that the business will continue to operate. (US Dept of Treasury- Interagency) The value of a business entity rather than the value of the real property. The valuation is based on the existing operations of the business and its current operating record, with the assumption that the business will continue to operate. (Interagency Appraisal and Evaluation Guidelines (December 2, 2010))

gold exchange standard

A variant form of the gold standard under which a country pegged the value of its currency to the value of the currency of a "major" country, e.g. sterling or dollars, which was itself on a gold standard. The international monetary regime in force between 1958 and 1970 is frequently described as a "gold exchange standard" system because of the wide use of the dollar, itself pegged to gold, as a reserve currency and as an accepted medium of exchange internationally. (Federal Reserve Education) A variant form of the gold standard under which a country pegged the value of its currency to the value of the currency of a �major� country, e.g. sterling or dollars, which was itself on a gold standard. The international monetary regime in force between 1958 and 1970 is frequently described as a gold exchange standard system because of the wide use of the dollar, itself pegged to gold, as a reserve currency and as an accepted medium of exchange internationally. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF)

gold standard

A monetary system in which currencies are defined in terms of a given weight of gold. (Federal Reserve Education) A monetary system in which currencies are defined in terms of a given weight of gold. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF)

good bank / bad bank model

A structured process for isolating non?performing assets or services (bad bank) and simultaneously creating a new charter to house the performing assets or services (good bank). The new charter can be either a bridge institution, or an ongoing concern. (National Credit Union Administration)

Good Faith Estimate

(aka GFE) The estimate on closing costs and monthly mortgage payments provided by a lender to the homebuyer within 3 days of applying for a loan. (Ginnie Mae) A written statement from the lender itemizing the approximate costs and fees for the mortgage. (Freddie Mac) A form required by the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) that discloses an estimate of the amount or range of charges, for specific settlement services the borrower is likely to incur in connection with the mortgage transaction. (Federal Trade Commission) Is an estimate of charges or range of charges that a prospective borrower is likely to incur in connection with financing a home. (US Dept of HUD- Fair Lending: Learn the Facts) An estimate of the settlement charges you are likely to incur; it also contains other information about the loan. (US Dept of HUD- HUD's Settlement Cost Booklet) An estimate of settlement charges a borrower is likely to incur, as a dollar amount, and related loan information, based upon common practice and experience in the locality of the mortgaged property, as provided on the form prescribed in � 3500.7 and prepared in accordance with the Instructions in Appendix C to this part. (US Dept of HUD- RESPA Act: Final Rule) An estimate of all closing fees including pre-paid and escrow items as well as lender charges; must be given to the borrower within three days after submission of a loan application. (US Dept of HUD)

governance

Governance or corporate governance means practices and procedures that comply with applicable chartering acts and other federal law, rules, and regulations, and must be consistent with the safe and sound operations of a company. Each credit union must follow the corporate governance practices and procedures of the applicable law of the jurisdiction in which the credit union's principal office is located, to the extent not inconsistent with federal law. Generally, each credit union designates in its bylaws the body of law elected for its corporate governance practices and procedures. (National Credit Union Administration)

government mortgage

A mortgage loan that is insured or guaranteed by a federal government entity such as the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), or the Rural Housing Service (RHS). (Federal Trade Commission) Any mortgage insured by a government agency, such as the FHA or VA. (HardwickAssociates)

Government National Mortgage Association

(aka GNMA or Ginnie Mae) The Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae) was created in 1968 as a wholly- owned government corporation within the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Ginnie Mae guarantees the principal and interest payments on mortgage-backed securities (MBS) issued by program participants. The securities are collateralized by the cash flows from loans insured or guaranteed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), Department of Veterans Affairs Home Loan Program (VA), Office of Public and Indian Housing (PIH), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development (RD). The Ginnie Mae guarantee assures investors that they will receive their monthly principal and interest (P&I) payments on outstanding securities in a timely manner. This guarantee is the only MBS backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government. (Ginnie Mae) A government-owned corporation that provides sources of funds for residential mortgage loans, insured or guaranteed by the FHA or VA. (Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council) A government-owned corporation within the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that guarantees securities backed by mortgages that are insured or guaranteed by other government agencies. Popularly known as �Ginnie Mae.� (Federal Trade Commission) A wholly owned government corporation within HUD, established in 1968 as a spinoff from Fannie Mae. The main functions of Ginnie Mae are (1) the purchase and sale of certain FHA and VA mortgages pursuant to various programs designed to support the housing market and (2) the guarantee of mortgage-backed securities secured by pools of FHA and VA mortgages. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation) The Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae) is a government corporation within the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Ginnie Mae guarantees privately issued securities backed by mortgages or loans which are insured or guaranteed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA), or the Rural Housing Service (RHS) and certain other loans or mortgages guaranteed or insured by the government. (US Dept of Agriculture- Rural Development)

government recording and transfer charges

Fees for legally recording your deed and mortgage. These fees may be paid by you or by the seller depending upon the terms of the sales agreement. (US Dept of HUD- HUD's Settlement Cost Booklet)

government securities

Securities issued by the U.S. Treasury or federal agencies. (Federal Reserve Education) Securities issued by the U.S. Treasury or federal agencies. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF)

Government Sponsored Enterprise

HUD regulates two housing-related government-sponsored enterprises, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which were chartered by Congress to create a secondary market for residential mortgage loans. They are considered "government-sponsored" because Congress authorized their creation and established their public purposes. (US Dept of HUD) Private corporations created by the U.S. Government to reduce borrowing costs. They are chartered by the U.S. Government but are not considered to be direct obligations. For example, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are GSEs. (Making Home Affordable) A collection of financial services corporations formed by the United States Congress to reduce interest rates for farmers and homeowners. Examples include Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. (US Dept of HUD)

governmental

In the case of building codes, these are the State or local organizations/agencies responsible for building code enforcement. (US Environmental Protection Agency)

Governor

An official appointed to govern; the manager or administrative head of an organization, business or institution. (Federal Reserve Education) A device used to regulate motor speed, or, in a wind energy conversion system, to control the rotational speed of the rotor. (US Dept of Energy)

grab sample

A single sample of soil or of water taken without regard to time or flow. (US EPA- Pesticides)

graben

Down-dropped block of rock bounded on both sides by faults. See fault-block. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gradation

Proportion of material of each grain-size present in a given soil. The proportions by mass of a soil or fragmented rock distributed in specified particle-size ranges. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grade

The slope of land around a building. Also ground level. (HardwickAssociates) The finished ground level adjoining a building at all exterior walls. (Energycodes.gov)

grade (pitch)

The elevation of a surface or a surface slope. The elevation of the invert of the bottom of a pipeline, canal, culvert, or conduit. The fall (slope) of a line of pipe in reference to a horizontal plane. The inclination or slope of a pipeline, conduit, stream channel, or natural ground surface; usually expressed in terms of the ratio or percentage of number of units of vertical rise or fall per unit of horizontal distance (rise over run). (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grade elevation

The lowest or highest finished ground level that is immediately adjacent to the walls of the building. Use natural (pre-construction), ground level, if available, for Zone AO and Zone A (without BFE). (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

grade line

The point at which the ground rests against the foundation wall. (Publications- USA.gov)

grade stake

A stake indicating the amount of cut or fill required to bring the ground to a specified level. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

graded stream

Streams that receive and carry away equal amounts of sediment. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grader

A machine with a centrally located blade that can be angled to cast to either side, with independent hoist control on each side. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gradient

General slope or rate of change in vertical elevation per unit of horizontal distance of water surface of a flowing stream. Slope along a specific route, as of a road surface, channel or pipe. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

graduated payment

Repayment terms calling for gradual increases in the payments on a closed-end obligation. A graduated payment loan usually involves negative amortization. (Federal Reserve Education) Repayment terms calling for gradual increases in the payments on a closed-end obligation. A graduated payment loan usually involves negative amortization. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF)

graduated payment mortgage

(aka GPM) A fixed-interest loan with lower payments in the early years than in the later years. The amount of the payment gradually increases over a period of time and then levels off at a payment sufficient to pay off the loan over the remaining amortization period. (Ginnie Mae) A mortgage requiring lower payments in early years than in later years. Payments increase in steps until the installments are sufficient to amortize the loan. Allows for negative amortization in the early years. (US Dept of Commerce- Census Bureau) Mortgages that begin with lower monthly payments that get slowly larger over a period of years, eventually reaching a fixed level and remaining there for the life of the loan. Graduated payment loans may be good if you expect your annual income to increase. (US Dept of HUD) A loan in which monthly payments are relatively small in the beginning and gradually increase in dollar amount over the life of the mortgage. (Old Republic National Title Insurance Co)

grain alcohol

Ethanol. (US Dept of Energy)

grandfathered activities

Nonbank activities, some of which would normally not be permissible for bank holding companies and foreign banks in the United States, but which were acquired or engaged in before a particular date. Such activities may be continued under the "grandfather" clauses of the Bank Holding Company Act and the International Banking Act. (Federal Reserve Education)

grandfathering

An exemption based on circumstances previously existing. �Under NFIP statutory grandfathering, buildings located in Emergency Program communities and Pre-FIRM buildings in the Regular Program are eligible for subsidized flood insurance rates. �Under NFIP administrative grandfathering, Post-FIRM buildings in the Regular Program built in compliance with the floodplain management regulations in effect at the start of construction will continue to have favorable rate treatment even though higher Base Flood Elevations (BFEs) or more restrictive, greater risk zone designations result from FIRM revisions. Policyholders who have remained loyal customers of the NFIP by maintaining continuous coverage (since coverage was first obtained on the building) are also eligible for administrative grandfathering. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

granite

Light-colored, coarse-grained intrusive igneous rock with quartz and feldspar as dominant minerals and typically peppered with mica and hornblende. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

granitic

General term for all light-colored, granite-like igneous rocks. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

granodiorite

Coarse-grained intrusive igneous rock with less quartz and more feldspar than true granite and typically darker. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grantee

An individual to whom an interest in real property is conveyed. (US Dept of HUD) A person who acquires an interest in land by deed, grant, or other written instrument. (Old Republic National Title Insurance Co) Any person who is given ownership of a piece of property. (HardwickAssociates)

grantor

An individual conveying an interest in real property. (US Dept of HUD) A person, who, by a written instrument , transfers to another an interest in land. (Old Republic National Title Insurance Co) Any person who gives away ownership of a piece of property. (HardwickAssociates)

grants

A federal financial assistance award making payment in cash or in kind for a specified purpose. The federal government is not expected to have substantial involvement with the state or local government or other recipient while the contemplated activity is being performed. The term "grants-in-aid" is commonly restricted to grants to states and local governments. (BTS3) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

grapple

A clamshell-type bucket having three or more jaws. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

Grassland Reserve Program

(aka GRP) Program established in the 2002 Farm Act to assist owners, through long-term contracts or easements, in restoring grassland and conserving virgin grassland. Restored, improved, or natural grassland, rangeland, and pasture, including prairie, can be enrolled. Eligible grassland can be enrolled under long term contracts or easements. The program is administered jointly by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, Farm Service Agency, and Forest Service. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

gravel

Loose rounded fragments of rock that will pass a 3-inch sieve and be retained on a No. 4 U.S. Standard sieve (3/16 inch). (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gravel�

A mixture composed primarily of rock fragments 2 mm (0.08 inch) to 7.6 cm (3 inches) in diameter. Usually contains much sand. (US Fish & Wildlife Service)

gravel blanket

Thin layer of gravel spread over an area either of natural ground, excavated surface, or embankment. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gravel surfacing

Layer of gravel spread over an area intended for vehicular or personnel traffic, such as roads, parking lots and sidewalks. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gravelfill

Gravel used to fill holes or spaces. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gravity arch dam

A dam designed to combine load resisting features of both a gravity and arch type dam. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gravity dam

A dam constructed of concrete and/or masonry which relies on its weight and internal strength for stability. Gravity dams are generally used where the foundation is rock and earthfill in proper quality and quantity is not available. See arch-gravity dam, crib dam, curved gravity dam, cyclopean dam, and hollow gravity dam. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gravity irrigation

Irrigation method that applies irrigation water to fields by letting it flow from a higher level supply canal through ditches or furrows to fields at a lower level. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gray water

Wastewater other than sewage, such as sink and bath drainage or washing machine discharge. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grazers

Organisms such as protozoa and nematodes that eat bacteria and fungi. (US Dept of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service)

green box policies

See green box policies in ERS WTO Briefing Room Glossary. (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

green certificates

Green certificates represent the environmental attributes of power produced from renewable resources. By separating the environmental attributes from the power, clean power generators are able to sell the electricity they produce to power providers at a competitive market value. The additional revenue generated by the sale of the green certificates covers the above-market costs associated with producing power made from renewable energy sources. Also known as green tags, renewable energy certificates, or tradable renewable certificates. (US Dept of Energy)

green lumber

Lumber which has been inadequately dried and which tends to warp or "bleed" resin. (Publications- USA.gov)

green power

A popular term for energy produced from clean, renewable energy resources. (US Dept of Energy)

green pricing

A practice engaged in by some regulated utilities (i.e. power providers) where electricity produced from clean, renewable resources is sold at a higher cost than that produced from fossil or nuclear power plants, supposedly because some buyers are willing to pay a premium for clean power. (US Dept of Energy)

greenhouse effect

A popular term used to describe the heating effect due to the trapping of long wave (length) radiation by greenhouse gases produced from natural and human sources. (US Dept of Energy)

greenhouse gases

Those gases, such as water vapor, carbon dioxide, tropospheric ozone, methane, and low level ozone that are transparent to solar radiation, but opaque to long wave radiation, and which contribute to the greenhouse effect. (US Dept of Energy)

greenwood

Freshly cut, unseasoned, wood. (US Dept of Energy)

greywater

Waste water from a household source other than a toilet. This water can be used for landscape irrigation depending upon the source of the greywater. (US Dept of Energy)

grid

A common term referring to an electricity transmission and distribution system. (US Dept of Energy) A system of interconnected power lines and generators that is managed so that the generators are dispatched as needed to meet the requirements of the customers connected to the grid at various points. Gridco is sometimes used to identify an independent company responsible for the operation of the grid. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grid operator

An entity that oversees the delivery of electricity over the grid to the customer, ensuring reliability and safety. A grid operator potentially could be independent of electric utilities or other suppliers. See Independent System Operator. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grid-connected system

Independent power systems that are connected to an electricity transmission and distribution system (referred to as the electricity grid) such that the systems can draw on the grid's reserve capacity in times of need, and feed electricity back into the grid during times of excess production. (US Dept of Energy)

grizzly (grizzlie)

A coarse screen used to remove oversize pieces from earth or blasted rock. A gate or closure on a chute. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

groin

The contact between the upstream or downstream face of a dam and the abutments. The area along the contact (or intersection) of the face of a dam with the abutments. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gross annual income

The total income, before taxes and other deductions, received by all members of the tenant�s household. There shall be included in this total income all wages, social security payments, retirement benefits, military and veteran's disability payments, unemployment benefits, welfare benefits, interest and dividend payments and such other income items as the Secretary considers appropriate. (US Dept of HUD)

gross area

The sum total of all floor space, including areas such as stairways and closet space. Often measured based on external wall lengths. (HardwickAssociates)

gross calorific value

The heat produced by combusting a specific quantity and volume of fuel in an oxygen-bomb colorimeter under specific conditions. (US Dept of Energy)

gross cash recovery

(aka GCR) The gross cash collections projected during the expected holding period of an asset (or a pool of assets) in a receivership. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

gross collections

The gross cash recoveries�prior to paying the holding, marketing, and selling costs�resulting from the disposition of one or more assets. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

gross crop value

This value is the sum of annual receipts from sale of crops produced. Production of crops, such as pasture and hay which normally are consumed on the farm by livestock, shall be converted to cash market values and included with crop sales. Total market value of all crop production from irrigated lands before deducting costs of production. Unit prices represent the weighted average prices received by farmers for the part of the crop that is sold. Production and price information are obtained from reports of farmers, project-operating personnel, local agricultural specialists, and State-Federal agricultural statisticians. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gross domestic product

(aka GDP) The broadest measure of aggregate economic activity encompassing every measure of the economy, measuring the total value of goods and services produced during a specific period. (Federal Reserve Education) The total value of a nation�s output, income, or expenditure produced within a nation�s physical borders. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF) 1) The total value of goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States. As long as the labor and property are located in the United States, the supplier (that is, the workers and, for property, the owners) may be either U.S. residents or residents of foreign countries. (DOE3) 2) The total output of goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States, valued at market prices. As long as the labor and property are located in the United States, the suppliers (workers and owners) may be either U.S. residents or residents of foreign countries. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

gross floor area

The sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but it excludes covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. (Energycodes.gov)

gross generation

The total amount of electricity produced by a power plant. (US Dept of Energy) Total amount of electrical energy produced by a generating station or stations, measured at generator terminals. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gross income

Money earned before taxes and other deductions. Sometimes it may include income from self-employment, rental property, alimony, child support, public assistance payments, and retirement benefits. (US Dept of HUD)

gross monthly income

The income you earn in a month before taxes and other deductions. It may also include rental income, self-employed income, income from alimony, child support, public assistance payments, and retirement benefits. (Freddie Mac) The income you earn in a month before taxes and other deductions. It also may include rental income, self-employed income, income from alimony, child support, public assistance payments, and retirement benefits. (Federal Trade Commission)

gross national product

(aka GNP) A country�s total output of goods and services from all forms of economic activity measured at market prices for a calendar year. (Federal Reserve Bank- SF) A measure of monetary value of the goods and services becoming available to the nation from economic activity. Total value at market prices of all goods and services produced by the nation's economy. Calculated quarterly by the Department of Commerce, the Gross National Product is the broadest available measure of the level of economic activity. (DOE6) (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

gross negligence

A standard of conduct under which an officer or director of a failed institution may be held personally liable for monetary damages in a civil action. This standard generally establishes �liability� based upon culpable conduct that is grossly negligent or worse, although definitions vary from state to state. (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

gross vehicle weight

(aka GVW) The combined total weight of a vehicle and its freight. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

gross vehicle weight rating (truck)

The maximum rated capacity of a vehicle, including the weight of the base vehicle, all added equipment, driver and passengers, and all cargo. (US Dept of Transportation- Federal Highway Administration)

gross wall area

The gross wall area includes the opaque area of above-grade walls, the opaque area of any individual wall of a conditioned basement less than 50% below grade (including the below-grade portions), all windows and doors (including windows and doors of conditioned basements), and the peripheral edges of floors. (Energycodes.gov)

gross window area

Includes the rough-opening area of the window, not just the transparent-glass area. (Energycodes.gov)

gross withdrawals

��Full well stream volume from both oil and gas wells, including all natural gas plant liquids and nonhydrocarbon gases after oil, lease condensate, and water have been removed. Also includes production delivered as royalty payments and production used as fuel on the lease. (US Energy Information Administration)

ground

A device used to protect the user of any electrical system or appliance from shock. (US Dept of Energy)

ground loop

In geothermal heat pump systems, a series of fluid-filled plastic pipes buried in the shallow ground, or placed in a body of water, near a building. The fluid within the pipes is used to transfer heat between the building and the shallow ground (or water) in order to heat and cool the building. (US Dept of Energy)

ground motion

A general term including all aspects of ground motion, namely particle acceleration, velocity, or displacement, from an earthquake or other energy source. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

ground motion parameters

Numerical values representing vibratory ground motion, such as particle acceleration, velocity, and displacement, frequency content, predominant period, spectral intensity, and duration. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

ground reflection

Solar radiation reflected from the ground onto a solar collector. (US Dept of Energy)

ground rent

Payment for the use of land when title to a property is held as a leasehold estate (that is, the borrower does not actually own the property, but has a long-term lease on it). (Federal Trade Commission) The rent paid on leased land. Same as "land rent." (US Dept of Commerce- Census Bureau)

ground water

Water found below the surface of the land, usually in porous rock formations. Ground water is the source of water found in wells and springs and is used frequently for drinking. (US EPA- Pesticides) Water in the ground that is in the zone of saturation, from which wells, springs, and ground-water runoffare supplied. (After Meinzer, 1949, p. 385.) (US Dept of the Interior- US Geological Survey) Water that flows or seeps downward and saturates soil or rock, supplying springs and wells. The upper level of the saturated zone is called the water table. Water stored underground in rock crevices and in the pores of geologic materials that make up the earth's crust. That part of the subsurface water which is in the zone of saturation; phreatic water. Water found underground in porous rock strata and soils, as in a spring. Water under ground, such as in wells, springs and aquifers. Generally, all subsurface water as distinct from surface water; specifically, that part of the subsurface water in the saturated zone where the water is under pressure greater than atmospheric. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

ground water mining (overdraft)

Pumping of ground water for irrigation or other uses, at rates faster than the rate at which the ground water is being recharged. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

ground water recharge

The flow to ground water storage from precipitation, inflitration from streams, and other sources of water. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

ground water table

The upper boundary of ground water where water pressure is equal to atmospheric pressure, i.e., water level in a bore hole after equilibrium when ground water can freely enter the hole from the sides and bottom. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

ground-fault circuit interrupter

(aka GFCI) An electrical device designed to protect people (not equipment) from electrical shock. The GFCI is a very sensitive device that can detect ground leakage currents as low as 5 milliamperes. The GFCI can be provided as part of a receptacle or as part of a circuit breaker. When the GFCI detects a ground leakage current, it either deenergizes the receptacle or trips the circuit breaker. Whether the GRCI is part of a receptacle or part of a circuit breaker, it will have a TEST button. Pressing the TEST button will operate the GFCI device and deenergize the circuit. The receptacle will have a RESET button and the circuit breaker is manually reset by hand. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grounds

Pieces of wood embedded in plaster of walls to which skirtings are attached. Also wood pieces used to stop the plaster work around doors and windows. (Publications- USA.gov)

ground-source heat pump

#VALUE!

ground-water outflow

That part of the discharge from a drainage basin that occurs through the ground water. The term "underflow" is often used to describe the ground-water outflow that takes place in valley alluvium (instead of the surface channel) and thus is not measured at a gaging station. (US Dept of the Interior- US Geological Survey)

ground-water runoff

That part of the runoff which has passed into the ground, has become ground water, and has been discharged into a stream channel as spring or seepage water. See also Base runoff and Direct runoff. (US Dept of the Interior- US Geological Survey)

group flood insurance

Issued by the NFIP Direct Program in response to a Presidential disaster declaration. Disaster assistance applicants, in exchange for a modest premium, receive a minimum amount of building and/or contents coverage for a 3-year policy period. An applicant may cancel the group policy at any time and secure a regular Standard Flood Insurance Policy through the NFIP. (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

grout

A fluid mixture of cement and water or sand, cement, and water used to seal joints and cracks in a rock foundation. A fluid material that is injected into soil, rock, concrete, or other construction material to seal openings and to lower the permeability and/or provide additional structural strength. There are four major types of grouting materials: chemical, cement, clay, and bitumen. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grout blanket

An area of the foundation systematically grouted to a uniform shallow depth. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grout cap

A concrete pad or wall constructed to facilitate subsequent pressure grouting of the grout curtain beneath the grout cap. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grout curtain (grout cutoff)

A vertical zone, usually thin, in the foundation into which grout is injected to reduce seepage beneath a dam. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

grouting

Material used around ceramic tile. (HardwickAssociates) Filling cracks and crevices with a cement mixture. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

growing season

The frost-free period of the year (see U.S. Department of Interior, National Atlas 1970:110-111 for generalized regional delineation). (US Fish & Wildlife Service) The period and/or number of days between the last freeze in the spring and the first frost in the fall for the freeze threshold temperature of the crop or other designated temperature threshold. (US Dept of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service) The period, often the frost-free period, during which the climate is such that crops can be produced. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

growing-equity mortgage

(aka GEM) A fixed-rate mortgage in which the monthly payments increase according to an agreed-upon schedule, with the extra funds applied to reduce the loan balance and loan term. (Federal Trade Commission)

growth

An increase as in, size, number, value, or strength. (Federal Reserve Education)

grubbing

Removal of stumps, roots, and vegetable matter from the ground surface after clearing and prior to excavation. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gse

See Government Sponsored Entrprise (US Dept of HUD)

guarantee agreement

The written agreement between the Agency and the lender setting forth the terms and conditions of the guarantee with respect to an individual loan. (US Dept of Agriculture- Rural Development)

guarantee fees

The fees paid by the lender to the Agency for the loan guarantee. An initial guarantee fee is due at the time the guarantee is issued. An annual guarantee fee is due at the beginning of each year that the guarantee remains in effect. (US Dept of Agriculture- Rural Development)

guaranteed loan

Any loan for which the Agency provides a loan guarantee. (US Dept of Agriculture- Rural Development) Farm Service Agency (FSA) guarantees loans lenders (e.g., banks, Farm Credit System institutions, credit unions) up to 95 percent of any loss of principal and interest on a loan. The guarantee permits lenders to extend agricultural credit to farmers who do not meet the lenders' normal underwriting criteria. FSA guaranteed loans are made for both farm ownership (FO) and operating (OL) purposes. FSA can guarantee OL or FO loans up to $949,000 (amount adjusted annually based on inflation). (US Dept of Agriculture- Economic Research Service)

guaranteed share account

A share account in which the amount in excess of the limit insured by the NCUSIF is guaranteed by the Stabilization Fund pursuant to the Temporary Corporate Credit Union Share Guarantee Program. (National Credit Union Administration)

guaranteed student loan

An extension of credit from a financial institution that is guaranteed by a Federal or State government entity to assist with tuition and other educational expenses. The government entity is responsible for paying the interest on the loan and paying the lender to manage it. The government entity also is responsible for the loan if the student defaults. (Help With My Bank)

guarantor

A party who agrees to be responsible for the payment of another party's debts should that party default. (Help With My Bank)

guaranty fee

Payment to FannieMae from a lender for the assurance of timely principal and interest payments to MBS (Mortgage Backed Security) security holders. (US Dept of HUD)

guard gate (emergency)

The first gate in a series of flow controls, remaining open while downstream gates or valves are operating. A gate, usually located between the emergency and regulating gates, used in the closed position to permit servicing of the downstream regulating gate(s) or valve(s) or the downstream conduit. See emergency gate. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

guardian

One appointed by the court to administer the affairs of an individual not capable of administering his or her own affairs. (Old Republic National Title Insurance Co)

gullying

Small-scale stream erosion. (US Dept of the Interior- Bureau of Reclamation)

gusset

A brace or bracket used to strengthen a structure. (Publications- USA.gov)

guttation

The loss of water in liquid form from the uninjured leaf or stem of the plant, principally through water stomata. (Lee, 1949, p. 260.) (US Dept of the Interior- US Geological Survey)

gutter

A channel at the eaves for conveying away rain water. (Publications- USA.gov) The trough around the edge of the roof that catches and diverts rain. (HardwickAssociates) The space available for wiring inside panel boards and other electric panels; a separate wireway used to supplement wiring spaces in electric panels. (Energycodes.gov)

guy wire

Cable use to secure a wind turbine tower to the ground in a safe, stable manner. (US Dept of Energy)